Tendinopathy


Tendons connect muscle to bone and tendinopathy results in the repeated stress or microtraumas from constant overuse in the area. The two most common types are tendinitis and tendinois.


Tendinitis is an acutely inflamed swollen tendon that doesn't have microscopic tendon damage. The underlying culprit in tendinitis is inflammation. Tendinosis, on the other hand, is a chronically damaged tendon with disorganized fibers and a hard, thickened, scarred and rubbery appearance.


The most common areas to get tendinopathy are in large muscle joints that are used the most. For example, rotator cuff, elbow, wrist, and achilles tendon.


Tendinopathies often are a result from overload injuries that disrupt the muscle tendon. For example, when a runner increases mileage, or the repetitive motion from engaging in a racket sport.


If you experience pain and swelling in any of these area, immediately stop that activity until you get a diagnosis from your physician and the okay to return to sports. Usually the most common way to heal this injured tendon is rest or reduced activity.


It the case of exercise, the best/fastest way to heal it to not do any activities to aggravate the area. If you still want to exercise, choose movements that do not include the affected area. Once symptoms have decreased, strengthening of the affected area is appropriate. This would be a good time to add some rehab and prehab exercises to the beginning or end of your strength workouts to prevent this from happening again.


If you have had any of these issues in the past, let your exercise physiologist know, so they make sure not to overload that area and can decrease the chance of it coming back or further injury. They can also recommend alternatives that put less stress on the area, as well as some strengthening exercises for that area.

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